U.S. Soccer

Player Eligibility List

CRITERIA: In order to meet the player eligibility criteria established by the Board of Directors, a player must have met No. 1 and either No. 2 or No. 3 of the following three criteria:

  1. A player must have been retired for at least three full calendar years, but for no more than 10 full calendar years (for purposes of the 2013 election, this means that a player must have retired no later than 2009 and no earlier than 2003).
  2. A player must have played at least 20 full international games for the United States. This 20-game requirement is reduced to 10 games if the games were prior to 1990.
  3. A player must have played at least five seasons in an American first-division professional league and been a postseason league all-star at least once.

Players who have met either No. 2 or No. 3 but have been retired for more than 10 years appear on the Veteran Player Eligibility List. Players who have failed to be named on at least five percent of the ballots in any election have been removed from this ballot for subsequent elections, but will be added to the Veterans ballot when they have been retired for more than 10 years.

ABOUT THIS LIST: The following is the list of players who meet the eligibility criteria approved by the Board of Directors of the National Soccer Hall of Fame to be candidates in the election that will choose the Player(s) to be inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013. These capsule biographies include both information about the achievements that enabled these players to meet the eligibility criteria and other information about their careers. The statement of how he or she met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria appears in bold italics just after the statement of when they last played in various teams and leagues.

The eligibility criteria were changed slightly by the Hall of Fame’s Board of Directors in 2008. This list contains some players who do not meet the new criteria, but did meet the old criteria. They have been retained on this list, as the criteria change approved in 2008 specified that players already on the list would not be dropped as a result of the change.

PLEASE NOTE: This list includes both information about the achievements that enabled these players to meet the eligibility criteria and other information about their playing careers as well as mention of non-playing achievements that might qualify a person in the future for the Builders Eligibility List.

Players on this list are grouped by the year that they last played. This refers to retirement from playing soccer in the United States at any professional or semiprofessional level including official non-league events such as the U.S. Open Cup and the CONCACAF Champions League, or from professional or semiprofessional soccer in a foreign country if the player is American.

If the player is not American but has met the eligibility criteria through his or her play in United States professional leagues, he or she is considered to be retired for purposes of this list upon departing from American professional soccer, unless he or she continues playing professional soccer in another country at a level ruled by the Hall of Fame’s historians to be equivalent to or better than the top American leagues. This level has usually been defined for men as including the first division of any country that has ever qualified for the World Cup, the first division of his native country, the second division of any country that has won the World Cup, and his national team. It has been defined for women as including the women’s first division of any country that has ever reached the quarterfinals of the Women’s World Cup, the women’s first division of her native country and her national team.

Foreign players play in other countries is not usually cited, because play by foreign players in foreign leagues and with the national teams of other countries has no bearing on their qualifications for the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

Years of play in foreign professional leagues by American players (including foreign-born players who later became American citizens and were eligible to play for the United States) are cited here.

Definitions & Clarifications:

American first-division professional league: the original North American Soccer League, Major League Soccer Women’s United Soccer Association or the Women’s Professional Soccer

MLS All-Star: selection to the postseason MLS Best Eleven.

WUSA All-Star: selection to the postseason All-WUSA First Team.

NASL champion, MLS champion, WUSA champion, WPS champion, or U.S. Open Cup champion: that the player played for the winning team in the championship game or series.

U.S. National Team: the full senior national team only (for either men or women), and not any of the other national teams, such as age-group teams, fielded by the USSF.

Professional leagues: when used in reference to an American player’s career in a foreign country, indicates that not all of the player’s career there was in the same league or division.

Full calendar year: January 1 through December 31.

Retirement: the year of the player’s final official game, rather than the year when he or she actually announced their retirement, which often was not the same year.

W-League: refers to the W-1 League from 1998 to 2001 and the one-level W-League in other years, but not the amateur W-2 League.

Last year of eligibility: refer only to eligibility for this Players election process.

References to Americans playing professionally "outside the United States" refer to playing in foreign leagues, not to playing on foreign soil for U.S. national teams or American clubs. It also does not refer to playing for Canadian or Puerto Rican teams in U.S.-based leagues.

The numbering of the divisions in English professional soccer has changed several times in recent years. On this list, the four divisions of English professional soccer are always referred to, in descending order, as the Premier League, second division, third division and fourth division.

Players who last played in 2003
(last year of eligibility is 2013)

Mauricio Cienfuegos
(Last played in MLS in 2003)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A Salvadoran midfielder who was one of the leading foreign players in the early years of Major League Soccer, starring for the LA Galaxy.

Cienfuegos, renowned for his playmaking skills, also was a star of the Salvadoran National Team throughout the 1990s and first came to the attention of American soccer officials through his play in World Cup qualifying games against the United States. He played for the Galaxy in the first eight seasons of MLS and won three major titles with them: the U.S. Open Cup in 2001, the CONCACAF Champions Cup in 2001 and the MLS championship in 2002. In addition, he played for Los Angeles in three other MLS finals: in 1996, 1999 and 2001 and scored one of the Galaxy’s goals against D.C. United in the first MLS final.

Cienfuegos was chosen as an MLS All-Star three times in 1996, 1998 and 1999. He played in 206 MLS regular season games and 35 MLS playoff games.

Roy Lassiter
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 1997; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2000; last played in MLS in 2002; last played in the A-League in 2003)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who was one of the great goal scorers in the early seasons of MLS.

Lassiter played seven seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2002, for Tampa Bay, D.C., Miami and Kansas City. In 1996, when he was with Tampa Bay, he set an MLS record that still stands, with his 27 regular-season goals, and also was an all-star selection. With D.C., he won an MLS title in 1999 and a CONCACAF Champions Cup title in 1998. In addition to his MLS seasons, he played one season in the A-League, three seasons in the Costa Rican first division and one partial loan season in the Italian second division. In his 179 MLS regular-season games and 21 MLS playoff games, he scored a total of 101 goals.

Lassiter played 30 full internationals for the United States, the first in 1992 and the last in 2000, including five World Cup qualifiers in 1996 and 1997.

Tisha Venturini-Hoch
(Last played in the WPSL in 1997; last played in the W-League in 1998; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2000; last played in the WUSA in 2003)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who played in two World Cups for the United States.

Venturini, although not a starter, was one of the most visible stars of the team that won the Women’s World Cup in 1999, playing in two of the six games (including the final) and scoring two goals. She also had been a member of the United States team at the 1995 Women’s World Cup, where she played all six United States games, and the 1996 Olympic Games, where she played all five United States games. She played 132 full internationals for the United States between 1992 and her retirement from the National Team in 2000.

Venturini played three seasons in the WUSA, all for San Jose, and won a WUSA championship in 2001. She also played one season in the W-League and one season in the WPSL. She played 60 WUSA regular-season games and two WUSA playoff games.

Players who last played in 2004
(last year of eligibility is 2014)

Raul Diaz Arce
(Last played in MLS in 2001; last played in the A-League in 2004)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A Salvadoran forward who starred for several teams and won several championships in Major League Soccer.

Diaz Arce’s greatest fame came with D.C. United, which he joined at the start of MLS’s first season after having established a reputation via his play in El Salvador’s National Team. He was one of the stars of the D.C. United team that won the first two MLS championships and scored 46 goals in those two years.

Later in his six-season MLS career, he played for the New England Revolution, the San Jose Earthquakes, the Tampa Bay Mutiny and the Colorado Rapids, finishing his MLS career with a total of 150 MLS regular-season games and 12 MLS playoff games. He scored 90 goals in those 162 games. In addition to the 1996 and 1997 MLS titles, he also won the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup in 1996 and played two seasons in the A-League.

Marco Etcheverry
(Last played in MLS in 2003; last played at the required level outside the United States in 2004)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A Bolivian midfielder who was a key member of D.C. United’s dynasty of the first MLS seasons.

Etcheverry, known for the pinpoint passes that made him one of MLS’s premier playmakers, played eight seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2003, all of them for D.C. Before joining MLS, he had been a star of the Bolivian National Team, including playing in the 1994 World Cup, and he played briefly in Bolivia after retiring from MLS.

Etcheverry won three MLS championships with D.C. United in 1996, 97 and 99 as well as a Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup championship in 1996 and a CONCACAF Champions Cup title in 1998. He was chosen as an MLS All-Star in each of the league’s first four seasons, and was named the MLS most valuable player in 1998. Etcheverry played 191 MLS regular-season games and 23 MLS playoff games.

Joe-Max Moore
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2002; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2002; last played in MLS in 2004)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder and forward who was a member of United States teams at three World Cups and also starred for several club teams.

Moore first came to prominence in 1991, when he scored the winning goal for the United States in the Pan American Games final against Mexico, and the following year he played for the United States in the Olympic Games. By 1993, he was a regular in the full national team and was a member of the U.S. squad at the 1994 World Cup. He ended up playing 100 full internationals for the United States in a National-Team career that lasted through 2002. He appeared in four World Cup games, in 1998 and 2002, and 20 World Cup qualifiers. Perhaps the highlight of his national team career was the two goals he scored in the 2-0 win over Jamaica in 2001 that clinched the United States’ place in the 2002 World Cup. He also was a member of the U.S. team at the 1999 Confederations Cup.

Moore played six seasons in MLS, all of them with New England, three seasons in the English Premier League and two seasons in the German second division. He played 93 MLS regular-season games and two MLS playoff games.

Victor Nogueira
(Last played in the NASL in 1984; last played in the MISL in 2004)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his NASL seasons.

A goalkeeper who starred in the NASL and then continued playing indoors for two decades afterward.

Nogueira, who was born in Mozambique, broke into the North American Soccer League in 1979 with the Atlanta Chiefs. He won his only NASL championship in 1984, the league’s final season, with the Chicago Sting. During his six-season NASL career, he played 79 regular-season games and eight playoff games.

After the end of the NASL, Nogueira played nine seasons in the Major Indoor Soccer League and 13 seasons in the National Professional Soccer League. He was named the MISL Most Valuable Player in 1991 and 92, and the NPSL Most Valuable Player in 1996 and 98. He played 16 games for the U.S. National Futsal Team between 1992 and 2000.

Cindy Parlow
(Last played in the W-League in 1999; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2004; last played in the WUSA in 2004)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who was a regular in the team that won the 1999 Women’s World Cup and won Olympic gold medals in 1996 and 2004.

During her career in the U.S. National Team, Parlow played 158 full internationals. Those included two games at the 1996 Olympics, six at the 1999 Women’s World Cup, five at the 2000 Olympics, five at the 2003 Women’s World Cup and two at the 2004 Olympics, plus four World Cup qualifiers. Her first full international was against Russia in January 1996 and her last against Mexico in December 2004.

Parlow played four seasons in the Women’s United Soccer Association, all of them with the Atlanta Beat. She was a member of the Atlanta teams that finished as runner-up for the WUSA title in 2001 and 2003. She was a second-team WUSA All-Star in 2001, and during her WUSA career played 55 regular-season games and five playoff games.

Players who last played in 2005
(last year of eligibility is 2015)

Robin Fraser
(Last played in the A-League in 1995; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2000; last played in MLS in 2005)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A defender who was named to Major League Soccer’s postseason All-Star team five times in his 10 MLS seasons.

Fraser played in MLS from 1996 to 2005, for Los Angeles, Colorado and Columbus, including Los Angeles’ MLS runner-up teams in 1996 and 99. He was named to the MLS Best XI in 1996, 98, 99, 2000 and 2004 and was the MLS Defender of the Year twice, in 1999 and 2004. During his MLS career, he played 260 regular-season games and 30 playoff games.

Fraser played 26 full internationals for the United States, the first against Chile in June 1988 and the last against Ecuador in June 2001, including one World Cup qualifying game in 2000. He was a member of the U.S. team at the 1999 Confederations Cup. In addition to his MLS seasons, he also played five seasons in the American Professional Soccer League and A-League.

Shannon MacMillan
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 1997; last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2005; last played in the WPSL in 2005)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who played in the U.S. National Team for a dozen years and was the “supersub” of the 1999 Women’s World Cup champions.

MacMillan played 176 full internationals for the United States, the first against Australia in July 1993 and the last against Mexico in October 2005. Included in that long career were four World Cup qualifiers in 2002 and eight World Cup games in 1999 and 2003. She played in all six of the United States’ games at the 1999 Women’s World Cup, five of them as a substitute. She scored a goal in the one game she started, against North Korea, and her corner kick seconds after entering the quarterfinal against Germany set up the game winning goal. In the 1996 Olympics, she scored the winning goal in overtime in the United States’ semifinal victory over Norway and then had the opening goal of the United States’ victory over China in the final. In addition to her two World Cups, she also played for the United States in two Olympic Games, 1996 and 2000.

MacMillan played three seasons in the WUSA (plus the 2004 festivals), all of them with San Diego, two seasons in the Japanese professional league and one season in the WPSL. She was named an all-star in the inaugural WUSA season, 2001, and played 43 WUSA regular-season games.

Players who last played in 2006
(last year of eligibility is 2016)

Chris Henderson
(Last played in the WSL in 1989; last played professionally outside the United States in 1995; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2001; last played in MLS in 2006)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder and forward who was a regular for the United States in the early 1990s and then had a long career in Major League Soccer.

Henderson’s 79 caps for the United States included two World Cup qualifiers in 1997 and one in 2001. He was a member of the United States team at the 1990 World Cup, when he was only 19. He didn’t play in that World Cup, but a year later, he played every minute of all five U.S. games as the United States won its first major international championship at the CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Henderson played 11 seasons in MLS, for Colorado, Kansas City, Miami, Columbus and New York. He won an MLS title in 2000 when he was with Kansas City, and also reached the MLS final in 1997 with Colorado. Prior to the start of MLS in 1996, he had played one season each in the Western Soccer League, the Norwegian first division and the German second division.

He is among the all-time leaders in MLS appearances, having played 317 MLS regular-season games and 31 MLS playoff games.

In 2011, Henderson completed his fourth season as the technical director for the Seattle Sounders of MLS. Prior to that, he served as an assistant coach for one season with the Kansas City Wizards.

John O’Brien
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2005; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2006; last played in MLS in 2006)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who was one of the stars of the United States team at the 2002 World Cup.

O’Brien played 32 full internationals for the United States, the first against Austria in April 1998 and the last against Czech Republic in June 2006. Those included all five United States games at the 2002 World Cup, where he scored the opening goal of the American upset over Portugal, and one game at the 2006 World Cup. He also was a member of the United States team that won the 2005 CONCACAF Gold Cup and played for the United States in the 2000 Olympic Games.

O’Brien spent nearly his entire professional club career in Holland, where he played eight seasons in the first division. He also played one season, 2006, in Major League Soccer, for Chivas USA, but appeared in only one MLS game.

Tiffany Roberts
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2004; last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played in the W-League in 2006; last played in the in the WPSL in 2006)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who played for the United States in two World Cups and one Olympic Games.

Roberts played 109 full internationals for the United States, the first against Portugal in March 1994 and the last against New Zealand in October 2004. Those caps included nine in World Cup qualifiers in 1994 and 2002, five in the 1995 Women’s World Cup, two in the 1999 Women’s World Cup and five in the 1996 Olympic Games.

Roberts played four WUSA seasons, including the 2004 Festivals, all for Carolina. She was a second-team WUSA All-Star in 2003 and a WUSA champion in 2002 with Carolina. In addition to her WUSA seasons, in which she played 58 regular-season games and two playoff games, she also played one season in the WPSL and one season in the W-League.

Players who last played in 2007
(last year of eligibility is 2017)

Chris Armas
(Last played in the USISL in 1995; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2005; last played in MLS in 2007)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who was a longtime star of both MLS and the U.S. National Team.

Armas played the first 12 MLS seasons, initially for the Los Angeles Galaxy and later for the Chicago Fire. During those seasons, he played 264 MLS regular-season games and 37 playoff games. He was named to the MLS postseason Best XI five times, in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2003. He played in the MLS championship game four times, in 1998 (when he was on the winning side), 2000 and 2003 with Chicago and 1996 with Los Angeles. He also won three Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup titles with Chicago, in 1988, 2000 and 2003. In addition to his MLS seasons, he also played two seasons in the USISL.

Armas played 66 full internationals for the United States between 1998 and 2005. Those included 19 World Cup qualifiers, in 2000, 2001, 2004 and 2005. He never played in the World Cup, although he had been expected to be a starter in the 2002 World Cup before being injured a few weeks before the tournament. Injuries also prevented him from consideration for the 2006 squad. He was a member of the United States teams that won the CONCACAF Gold Cup finals in 2002 and 2005, played in the FIFA Confederations Cup in 2003 and was chosen as the U.S. Soccer’s Male Athlete of the Year in 2000.

Jason Kreis
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2000; last played in MLS in 2007)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A forward who starred in MLS for more than a decade.

Kreis played 12 seasons in MLS, the first nine of those for Dallas and the last three for Salt Lake. His best season was 1999, when he was the league’s leading scorer and was chosen as its Most Valuable Player. His only championship was a Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup title in 1997. During his MLS career, he played 305 regular-season games and 22 playoff games.

Kreis played 14 full internationals for the United States, the first against El Salvador in August 1996 and the last against Costa Rica in July 2000. Those 14 included two World Cup qualifiers, in 1996 and 2000.

In 2011, he completed his fifth season as the head coach of Real Salt Lake, the last club he played for, after having coached it to the MLS Cup title in 2009.

Players who last played in 2008
(last year of eligibility is 2018)

Lorrie Fair
(Last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2005; last played in the WPSL in 2006; last played professionally outside the United States in 2008)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who was a member of the United States team that won the 1999 Women’s World Cup.

Fair played 120 full internationals for the United States, the first against Norway in February 1996 and the last against Iceland in July 2005. Those games included four World Cup qualifiers in 2002, four in the 1999 Women’s World Cup and five in the 2000 Olympic Games.

Fair played all three WUSA seasons and the WUSA festivals in 2004 for Philadelphia. After the end of WUSA, she played two seasons in the WPSL, two in the French first division and one in the English first division.

Ante Razov
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2001; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2007; last played in MLS in 2008)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his U.S. National Team caps and his MLS seasons.

Forward who starred in both MLS and the U.S. National Team for more than a decade.

Razov played 13 seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2008 for Los Angeles, Chicago, New York and Chivas USA and is one of MLS’s all-time leading scorers, with 113 regular-season goals and 11 playoff goals. He was one of the stars of the Chicago Fire team that won the MLS championship in 1998, and he was a runner-up for the MLS title on three other occasions, in 1996 with Los Angeles and in 2000 and 2003 with Chicago. He was selected to the MLS Best XI after the 2003 season. He won three Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cups in 1998, 2000 and 2003.

Razov played 25 full internationals for the United States between 1995 and 2007, including nine World Cup qualifiers in 2000 and 2001. He also played for the United States in the 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Razov played one season outside the United States, in the Spanish second division. During his MLS career, he played 262 regular-season games and 35 playoff games.

Players who last played in 2009
(first year of eligibility is 2013; last year is 2019)

Wade Barrett
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2004; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2007; last played in MLS in 2009)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

Midfielder who was a key part of MLS champion teams in San Jose and Houston.

Barrett played nine seasons in MLS between 1998 and 2009, with the San Jose Earthquakes and the Houston Dynamo. Barrett played for the San Jose team that won the MLS title in 2001 before a three-season stretch in Europe. He returned to MLS, where the San Jose team had moved to Houston while he was away, and won further MLS championships with Houston in 2006 and 2007. He also was chosen to the MLS Best XI in 2002.

Barrett played two full internationals for the United States, in 2002 and 2007. He played two seasons in the Danish first division and one season in the Norwegian first division, and during his MLS career appeared in 241 regular-season games and 21 playoff games.

Angela Hucles
(Last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played in the W-League in 2006; last played in WPS in 2009; last played in the U.S. national team in 2009)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who was one of the stars of the United States’ victory in the 2008 Olympic Games.

Hucles played 109 full internationals for the United States, the first against Finland in 2002 and the last against Canada in 2009. For most of that time, she was a defensive midfielder, and before 2008 had scored only five goals in 70 games for the United States. For the 2008 Olympics, she was turned into a forward, and responded by scoring four goals in six games as the United States won the gold medal. She also won an Olympic gold medal in 2004, and was a member of the United States teams at the 2003 and 2007 Women’s World Cups.

Hucles played three seasons in WUSA and one season in WPS, all four of them for Boston. She was chosen as a second-team WUSA All-Star in 2003 and appeared in 56 WUSA/WPS regular-season games and one WUSA playoff game. She also played three seasons in the W-League.

Ben Olsen
(Last played in the U.S. national team in 2007; last played in MLS in 2009).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. national team caps.

A midfielder who played in MLS and the U.S. national team for more than a decade.

Olsen played for D.C. United throughout his MLS career, which lasted from 1998 to 2009. He was selected to the MLS postseason Best XI in 2007 and was the MLS Rookie of the Year in 1998. He won two MLS titles with D.C. United, in 1999 and 2004, and was runner-up in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup in 2009. He was a member of the D.C. teams that won the CONCACAF Champions Cup and the Inter-American Cup in 1998. Olsen played 221 MLS regular-season games and 22 MLS playoff games.

Olsen played 37 full internationals for the United States, the first against Australia in 1998 and the last against Paraguay in 2007. Those 37 caps included one World Cup qualifier in 2000 and one World Cup game in 2006. In addition to the 2006 World Cup, Olsen also played for the United States in the 1999 Confederations Cup, the 2000 Olympic Games, the 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup and the 2005 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

In 2012, he completed his second season as coach of D.C. United in MLS.

Tony Sanneh
(Last played in the USISL in 1995; last played in the NPSL in 1995; last played professionally outside the United States in 2004; last played in the U.S. national team in 2005; last played in the USL 1 in 2007; last played in MLS in 2009)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A defender who starred in the National Team and MLS, reaching his peak during the United States’ successful run at the 2002 World Cup.

Sanneh played 43 full internationals for the United States, the first against China in 1997 and the last against Costa Rica in 2005. Those 43 caps included all five of the United States games at the 2002 World Cup. Sanneh was one of only three players to play every minute of each of those games, and it was his cross that Brian McBride headed home for the third goal of the United States’ victory over Portugal. He also played 15 World Cup qualifiers in 2000, 2001 and 2004.

Sanneh played eight seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2009 for D.C., Columbus, Chicago, Colorado and Los Angeles, and was a member of the D.C. United teams that won the first two MLS titles in 1996 and 1997. He also won the U.S. Open Cup twice, in 1996 with D.C. and 2006 with Chicago, and played six seasons in German professional leagues, two seasons in the APSL and USL I, two seasons in the USISL and one season in the NPSL. During his MLS career he played 130 regular-season games and 20 playoff games.

Taylor Twellman
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2002; last played in the U.S. national team in 2008; last played in MLS in 2009)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who starred in MLS and the National Team.

Twellman played eight seasons in MLS between 2002 and 2009, all of them with New England. He was chosen to the MLS Best XI in 2002 and 2005, the latter a season in which he was named the league’s Most Valuable Player. He played 174 MLS regular-season games and 21 MLS playoff games. During those 195 games, he scored a total of 111 goals. His best goal scoring season was 2002, when he scored 23 regular-season goals and added two more in the playoffs.

Twellman was one of the leading stars of the New England teams that reached the MLS final four times in six seasons, in 2002, 2005, 2006 and 2007. He also won a Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup title with the Revolution, in 2007. Before joining the Revolution in 2002, he had played two seasons in the German second division.

Twellman played 30 full internationals for the United States, the first against El Salvador in 2002 and the last against Sweden in 2008. Those 30 caps included five World Cup qualifiers in 2004 and 2005. He was a member of the United States team at the 2003 Confederation Cup and the United States team that won the 2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup, qualifying it for the 2009 Confederations Cup.