U.S. Soccer

Player Eligibility List

CRITERIA: In order to meet the player eligibility criteria established by the Board of Directors, a player must have met No. 1 and either No. 2 or No. 3 of the following four criteria:

  1. A player must have been retired for at least three full calendar years, but for no more than 10 full calendar years (for purposes of the 2015 election, this means that a player must have retired no later than 2011 and no earlier than 2005).
  2. A player must have played at least 20 full international games for the United States.
  3. A player must have played at least five seasons in an American first-division professional league and been a postseason league all-star at least once.

Players who have met No. 2 or No. 3 but have been retired for more than 10 years appear on the Veterans Eligibility List. Players who have failed to be named on at least five percent of the ballots in any election have been removed from this ballot for subsequent elections, but will be added to the Veterans ballot when they have been retired for more than 10 years.

ABOUT THIS LIST: The following is the list of players who meet the eligibility criteria approved by the Board of Directors of the National Soccer Hall of Fame to be candidates in the election that will choose the Player(s) to be inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013. These capsule biographies include both information about the achievements that enabled these players to meet the eligibility criteria and other information about their playing careers as well as mention of non-playing achievements that might qualify a person in the future for the Builders Eligibility List. The statement of how he or she met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria appears in bold italics just after the statement of when they last played in various teams and leagues.

Any person who has been officially suspended by FIFA, CONCACAF, U.S. Soccer, the IOC or the USOC will be ineligible to appear on this list during the duration of that suspension.

The eligibility criteria were changed slightly by the Hall of Fame’s Board of Directors in 2008. This list contains some players who do not meet the new criteria, but did meet the old criteria. They have been retained on this list, as the criteria change approved in 2008 specified that players already on the list would not be dropped as a result of the change.

Players on this list are grouped by the year that they last played. This refers to retirement from playing soccer in the United States at any professional or semiprofessional level including official non-league events such as the U.S. Open Cup and the CONCACAF Champions League, or from professional or semiprofessional soccer in a foreign country if the player is American.

If the player is not American but has met the eligibility criteria through his or her play in United States professional leagues, he or she is considered to be retired for purposes of this list upon departing from American professional soccer, unless he or she continues playing professional soccer in another country at a level ruled by the Hall of Fame’s historians to be equivalent to or better than the top American leagues. This level has usually been defined for men as including the first division of any country that has ever qualified for the World Cup, the first division of his native country, the second division of any country that has won the World Cup, and his national team. It has been defined for women as including the women’s first division of any country that has ever reached the quarterfinals of the Women’s World Cup, the women’s first division of her native country and her national team.

Foreign players play in other countries is not usually cited, because play by foreign players in foreign leagues and with the national teams of other countries has no bearing on their qualifications for the National Soccer Hall of Fame (although it is sometimes a factor in determining their year of retirement).

Years of play in foreign professional leagues by American players (including foreign-born players who later became American citizens and were eligible to play for the United States) are cited here.

References to Americans playing professionally "outside the United States" refer to playing in foreign leagues, not to playing on foreign soil for U.S. national teams or American clubs. It also does not refer to playing for Canadian or Puerto Rican teams in U.S.-based leagues.

Definitions & Clarifications:
American first-division professional league: Major League Soccer, Women’s United Soccer Association or Women’s Professional Soccer.

MLS All-Star: selection to the postseason MLS Best Eleven.

WUSA All-Star: selection to the postseason All-WUSA First Team.

MLS champion, WUSA champion, WPS champion, or U.S. Open Cup champion: that the player played for the winning team in the championship game or series.

U.S. National Team: the full senior national team only (for either men or women), and not any of the other national teams, such as age-group teams, fielded by the USSF.

Professional leagues: when used in reference to an American player’s career in a foreign country, indicates that not the player’s entire career there was in the same league or division.

Full calendar year: January 1 through December 31.

Retirement: the year of the player’s final official game, rather than the year when he or she actually announced their retirement.

Last year of eligibility: refers only to eligibility for this Players election process. After a candidate’s eligibility via the Players Eligibility List expires, they will be moved to the Veterans Eligibility List.

Year that a player last played on the U.S. National Team: refers to full international games only.

The numbering of the divisions in English professional soccer has changed several times in recent years. On this list, the four divisions of English professional soccer are always referred to, in descending order, as the Premier League, second division, third division and fourth division.

Sources for the information cited here include The 2014 U.S. Soccer Federation Media Guides, The 2013 Major League Soccer Media Guide, the Major League Soccer, United Soccer Leagues and Major Indoor Soccer League and other websites and various media guides published over the years by the American Soccer League, the Women’s United Soccer Association, the American Professional Soccer League and the United Soccer Leagues.

Players who last played in 2005
(last year of eligibility is 2015)

Robin Fraser
(Last played in the A-League in 1995; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2000; last played in MLS in 2005)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A defender who was named to Major League Soccer’s postseason All-Star team five times in his 10 MLS seasons.

Fraser played in MLS from 1996-2005, for Los Angeles, Colorado and Columbus, including Los Angeles’ runner-up teams in 1996 and 1999. He was named to the MLS Best XI five times (1996, 1998-2000 and 2004), and was the MLS Defender of the Year twice (1999 and 2004). During his MLS career, he played in 260 regular-season games and in 30 playoff games.

Fraser played 26 full internationals for the United States, the first against Chile in June 1988 and the last against Ecuador in June 2001. He played in one FIFA World Cup qualifying game in 2000 and was a member of the U.S. team at the 1999 Confederations Cup. In addition to his MLS seasons, he also played five seasons in the American Professional Soccer League and A-League.

Shannon MacMillan
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 1997; last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2005; last played in the WPSL in 2005)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who played with the U.S. National Team for a dozen years and was the “supersub” of the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

MacMillan played 176 full internationals for the United States, the first against Australia in July 1993 and the last against Mexico in Oct. 2005. Included in her extensive career were four World Cup qualifiers in 2002 and eight World Cup games in 1999 and 2003. She played in all six of the United States’ games at the 1999 Women’s World Cup, five of them as a substitute. She scored a goal in the one game she started (against North Korea), and her corner kick seconds after entering the quarterfinal against Germany set up the game-winning goal. In the 1996 Olympics, she scored the winning goal in overtime to seal the United States’ semifinal victory over Norway, and had the opening goal of the United States’ victory over China in the final. In addition to her two World Cups and the 1996 Olympics, she also played for the United States the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney.

MacMillan played three seasons in the WUSA (plus the 2004 festivals) with San Diego, two seasons in the Japanese professional league and one season in the WPSL. She was named an All-Star in the inaugural WUSA season (2001) and played 43 WUSA regular-season games.

Players who last played in 2006
(last year of eligibility is 2016)

Chris Henderson
(Last played in the WSL in 1989; last played professionally outside the United States in 1995; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2001; last played in MLS in 2006)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder and forward who was a fixture for the United States in the early 1990s and then had a long career in Major League Soccer.

Henderson’s 79 caps for the United States included two FIFA World Cup qualifiers (1997 and 2001). He was a member of the United States team at the 1990 FIFA World Cup, when he was only 19. He didn’t play in that event, but a year later he played every minute of all five games as the United States went on to win its first major international championship: the 1991 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Henderson played 11 seasons in MLS for Colorado, Kansas City, Miami, Columbus and New York. He won an MLS title in 2000 with Kansas City, and also reached the MLS final in 1997 with Colorado. Prior to the start of MLS in 1996, he played one season each in the Western Soccer League, the Norwegian first division and the German second division. He is among the all-time leaders in MLS appearances, having played in 317 MLS regular-season games and in 31 MLS playoff games.

In 2014, Henderson completed his seventh season as the Sporting Director for the Seattle Sounders. Prior to that, he served as an assistant coach for one season with the Kansas City Wizards.

John O’Brien
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2005; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2006; last played in MLS in 2006)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who was one of the stars of the United States team at the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

O’Brien played 32 full internationals with the United States, the first against Austria in April 1998 and the last against Czech Republic in June 2006. He played in all five games for the United States at the 2002 FIFA World Cup, scoring the opening goal in the American upset over Portugal. He also played in one game at the 2006 FIFA World Cup, was a member of the United States team that won the 2005 CONCACAF Gold Cup and played for the United States in the 2000 Olympic Games.

O’Brien spent nearly his entire professional club career in the Netherlands, where he played eight seasons in the first division. He also played one season (2006) for Major League Soccer’s Chivas USA, but appeared in only one game.

Tiffany Roberts
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2004; last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played in the W-League in 2006; last played in the in the WPSL in 2006)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who played for the United States in two World Cups and one Olympic Games.

Roberts earned 109 caps with the United States, the first against Portugal in March 1994 and the last against New Zealand in Oct. 2004. She played in nine World Cup qualifiers in 1994 and 2002; five games during the 1995 Women’s World Cup; two games during the 1999 Women’s World Cup, and five in the 1996 Olympic Games.

Roberts played four WUSA seasons (including the 2004 Festivals) for Carolina. She was a second-team WUSA All-Star in 2003 and a WUSA champion in 2002 with Carolina. In addition to her WUSA seasons, where she played 58 regular-season games and two playoff games, she also played one season in the WPSL and one season in the W-League.

Players who last played in 2007
(last year of eligibility is 2017)

Chris Armas
(Last played in the USISL in 1995; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2005; last played in MLS in 2007)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who was a longtime star of both MLS and the U.S. National Team.

Armas played 12 MLS seasons, initially for the Los Angeles Galaxy and later on for the Chicago Fire. He played in 264 MLS regular-season games and in 37 playoff games. He was named to the MLS postseason Best XI five times (1998-2000, 2001 and 2003) and played in the MLS championship game four times (1996, 1998, 2000 and 2003), winning it in 1998 with the Fire. He also won three U.S. Open Cup titles with Chicago (1998, 2000 and 2003). In addition to his MLS seasons, he also played two seasons in the USISL.

Armas played 66 full internationals for the United States between 1998 and 2005. He played in 19 World Cup qualifiers from 2000-2005, but never played in a World Cup, though he was expected to be a starter in the 2002 event before being injured a few weeks before the tournament. Injuries also prevented him from consideration for the 2006 squad. He was a member of the National Teams that won the CONCACAF Gold Cup finals in 2002 and 2005, and played in the FIFA Confederations Cup in 2003. He was chosen as the U.S. Soccer’s Male Athlete of the Year in 2000.

Jason Kreis
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2000; last played in MLS in 2007)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A forward who starred in MLS for more than a decade.

Kreis played 12 seasons in MLS, the first nine for Dallas and the last three for Salt Lake. His best season was 1999, when he was the league’s leading scorer and was chosen as its Most Valuable Player. His only championship was a U.S. Open Cup title in 1997. During his MLS career, he played 305 regular-season games and 22 playoff games.

Kreis earned 14 caps with the United States, the first against El Salvador in Aug. 1996 and the last against Costa Rica in July 2000. He played in two World Cup qualifiers in 1996 and 2000.

In 2013, he completed his seventh season as the head coach of Real Salt Lake, the last club he played for, after having coached it to the MLS Cup title in 2009. In 2014, he was named the head coach of the newly established New York City FC, which is set to begin MLS play in 2015.

Players who last played in 2008
(last year of eligibility is 2018)

Ante Razov
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2001; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2007; last played in MLS in 2008)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his U.S. National Team caps and his MLS seasons.

Forward who starred in both MLS and the U.S. National Team for more than a decade.

Razov played 13 seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2008 for Los Angeles, Chicago, New York and Chivas. He is one of MLS’s all-time leading scorers with 113 regular-season goals and 11 playoff goals. He was one of the stars of the Chicago Fire team that won the MLS championship in 1998, and was a runner-up for the MLS title on three other occasions, in 1996 with Los Angeles, and in 2000 and 2003 with Chicago. He was selected to the MLS Best XI after the 2003 season. He won three U.S. Open Cups in 1998, 2000 and 2003.

Razov played 25 full internationals for the United States between 1995 and 2007, including nine World Cup qualifiers in 2000 and 2001. He also played for the United States in the 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Razov played one season outside the United States in the Spanish second division. During his MLS career, he played in 262 regular-season games and in 35 playoff games.

Players who last played in 2009
(first year of eligibility is 2013; last year is 2019)

Ben Olsen
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2007; last played in MLS in 2009).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. national team caps.

A midfielder who played in MLS and the U.S. national team for more than a decade.

Olsen played for D.C. United throughout his MLS career from 1998-2009. He was selected to the MLS postseason Best XI in 2007 and was the MLS Rookie of the Year in 1998. He won two MLS titles with D.C. United (1999 and 2004), and was runner-up in the U.S. Open Cup in 2009. He was a member of the D.C. teams that won the CONCACAF Champions Cup and the Inter-American Cup in 1998. Olsen played 221 MLS regular-season games and 22 MLS playoff games.

Olsen played 37 full internationals for the United States, the first against Australia in 1998 and the last against Paraguay in 2007. He played in one World Cup qualifier in 2000 and in one FIFA World Cup game in 2006. In addition, Olsen also played for the United States in the 1999 Confederations Cup, the 2000 Olympic Games, the 2000 CONCACAF Gold Cup and the 2005 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

In 2014, he completed his fourth season as coach of D.C. United in MLS.

Tony Sanneh
(Last played in the USISL in 1995; last played in the NPSL in 1995; last played professionally outside the United States in 2004; last played in the U.S. national team in 2005; last played in the USL 1 in 2007; last played in MLS in 2009).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. national team caps.

A defender who starred in the National Team and MLS, reaching his peak during the United States’ successful run at the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Sanneh played in 43 full internationals for the United States, the first against China in 1997 and the last against Costa Rica in 2005. He played in all five of the United States games at the 2002 FIFA World Cup, and was one of only three players to play every minute of each of those games. It was his cross that Brian McBride headed home for the third goal of the United States’ victory over Portugal. He also played in 15 World Cup qualifiers in 2000, 2001 and 2004.

Sanneh played eight seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2009 for D.C., Columbus, Chicago, Colorado and Los Angeles. He was a member of the D.C. United teams that won the first two MLS titles in 1996 and 1997. He also won the U.S. Open Cup twice; in 1996 with D.C. and in 2006 with Chicago. He played six seasons in German professional leagues: two seasons in the APSL and USL I, two seasons in the USISL and one season in the NPSL. During his MLS career he played in 130 regular-season games and in 20 playoff games.

Taylor Twellman
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2002; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2008; last played in MLS in 2009).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. national team caps.

A forward who starred in MLS and the U.S. National Team.

Twellman played eight seasons in MLS between 2002 and 2009, all of them with New England. He was chosen to the MLS Best XI in 2002 and 2005, the latter a season in which he was named the league’s Most Valuable Player. He played in 174 MLS regular-season games and in 21 MLS playoff games. During those 195 games, he scored a total of 111 goals. His best goal scoring season was 2002, when he scored 23 regular-season goals and added two more in the playoffs.

Twellman was one of the leading stars of the New England teams that reached the MLS final four times in six seasons (2002, 2005-07). He also won a U.S. Open Cup title with the Revs in 2007. Before joining the Revolution in 2002, he played two seasons in the German second division.

Twellman earned 30 caps with the United States, the first against El Salvador in 2002 and the last against Sweden in 2008. He played in five World Cup qualifiers in 2004 and 2005, was a member of the United States team at the 2003 Confederation Cup, and helped the USA win the 2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup, qualifying it for the 2009 Confederations Cup.

Players who last played in 2010
(last year of eligibility is 2020)

Chris Klein
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2006; last played in MLS in 2010).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. national team caps.

A midfielder who played in the U.S. National Team and was a star in MLS.

Klein played 22 full internationals for the United States, the first against Mexico in Oct. 2000 and the last against Germany in March 2006. He played in two FIFA World Cup qualifiers in 2000 and 2001.

He played 13 seasons in MLS between 1998 and 2010 for Kansas City, Real Salt Lake and Los Angeles, winning an MLS championship in 2000 with Kansas City. He also reached the MLS title game in 2009 with Los Angeles. He played in 333 MLS regular-season games and in 20 MLS playoff games.

Eddie Lewis
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2008; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2008; last played in MLS in 2010.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his U.S. national team caps and his MLS seasons.

A midfielder who starred in MLS, the U.S. National Team and the English leagues.

Lewis played 82 full internationals for the United States, the first against Peru in Oct. 1996 and the last against Trinidad & Tobago in Sept. 2008. He played in five FIFA World Cup Games (2002 and 2006) and in 21 World Cup qualifiers in 2000, 2001, 2004, 2005 and 2008. Perhaps Lewis’ most famous moment came in 2002, when his perfect cross from the left wing was headed into the net by Landon Donovan for the second goal of the United States’ World Cup upset over Mexico. In addition to World Cup play, Lewis was a member of the 1999 and 2003 Confederations Cups roster, and was a part of the U.S. team that won the 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Lewis played seven seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2010 for San Jose and Los Angeles, and was chosen to the MLS post-season Best XI in 1999. He played in 163 MLS regular-season games and in nine MLS playoff games.

Between 2000 and 2008, Lewis played nine seasons in English professional leagues, becoming a regular in several different clubs.

Kate Sobrero Markgraf
(Last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played professionally outside the United States in 2005; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2010; last played in WPS in 2010.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A defender who was a regular in the U.S. National Team that won the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

Markgraf earned 201 caps with the United States between 1998 and 2010. She played in 16 World Cup games (1999, 2003 and 2007), in five World Cup qualifiers (2002 and 2006), and 16 times during the Olympics (2000, 2004 and 2008). In addition to the 1999 Women’s World Cup final, Markgraf played in victorious efforts in the 2004 and 2008 Olympic finals. She started five of the United States six games at the 1999 World Cup, including playing every minute in the quarterfinal, semifinal and final matches. 

Markgraf played three seasons in the WUSA for Boston, and one season in WPS for Chicago. She also played one season in the Swedish first division. During her WUSA and WPS seasons she played a total of 76 regular-season games and one playoff game.

Clint Mathis
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2005; last played professionally outside the United States in 2008; last played in MLS in 2010.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who played 12 seasons in MLS and played in the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Mathis played in MLS from 1998-2010 for Los Angeles, New York, Salt Lake and Colorado. He was chosen to the MLS Best XI in 2000, won an MLS title in 2009 with Salt Lake, and played in 258 MLS regular-season games and in 29 MLS playoff games. He holds the MLS record for goals in a game (five) for the MetroStars against Dallas in 2000.

Mathis played 46 full internationals for the United States between 1998 and 2005, including seven World Cup qualifiers in 2000, 2001 and 2004, and three FIFA World Cup games in 2002. The 12 goals that he scored in those 46 games included a crucial one against South Korea in the 2002 World Cup. He also played for the United States at the 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup and the 2003 Confederations Cup.

In addition to his MLS years, Mathis also played two seasons in the German first division and one season in the Greek first division.

Jaime Moreno
(Last played in MLS in 2010.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A Bolivian forward who starred in MLS for 15 years.

Moreno played the bulk of his pro soccer career in MLS, and all but one of his 15 MLS seasons were with D.C. United. He played 372 MLS games, which at the time he retired, placed him third on the all-time list of games played in first-division United States leagues. He also was briefly MLS’ all-time leading goalscorer, finishing his career with 145 goals in MLS regular-season and playoff games. Moreno won four MLS championships with D.C. United (1996, 1997, 1999 and 2004), and played in the title game in each of those seasons. He was named to the MLS Best XI five times (1997, 1999, 2004-06), won the U.S. Open Cup with D.C. United in 1996 and 2008, and won the CONCACAF Champions Cup with D.C. United in 1998.

Moreno had played for clubs in Bolivia, Colombia and England before signing with D.C. in 1996, when he was 22 years old. He played 75 games for the Bolivian National Team between 1991 and 2008, playing at the 1994 World Cup, the 1997 Copa America and the 2007 Copa America.

Steve Ralston
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2007; last played in MLS in 2009; last played in the USSF second division in 2010.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his MLS seasons and his U.S. National Team caps.

A midfielder who was one of the leading stars in MLS throughout his long career.

In 2008, Ralston became the all-time leader in games played in United States first-division leagues. He retired from MLS the following year after having played in 411 MLS games. He has since dropped to second place on that list. Ralston played 14 seasons in MLS, six with Tampa Bay and eight with New England, and was named to the MLS Best XI in 1999, 2000 and 2002. He won a U.S. Open Cup with New England in 2007 and was a member of all four New England teams that reached the MLS final. After retiring from MLS, he played one season in the USSF second division.

Ralston earned 36 caps with the United States between 1997 and 2007, including eight World Cup qualifiers in 2004 and 2005. He was a member of the Men’s National Teams that won the CONCACAF Gold Cup in 2005 and 2007.

Briana Scurry
(Last played in the W-League in 1998; last played in the WUSA in 2004; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2008; last played in WPS in 2010.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both her WUSA/WPS seasons and her U.S. National Team caps.

A goalkeeper who was one of the stars of the United States victory in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup.

Scurry played for the U.S. National Team for 13 years and earned 173 caps. She was the goalkeeper for the U.S. teams that won the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup and won the gold medal at the 1996 and 2004 Olympics Games. She was a member of the U.S. squads at the 1995, 2003 and 2007 Women’s World Cups and the 2000 Olympic Games. She is widely known for her save during the penalty shootout at the 1999 final that helped the United States win the World Cup for the second time. Scurry’s caps include eight World Cup qualifiers and 19 World Cups game appearances.

Scurry played three seasons in the WUSA for Atlanta and two WPS seasons for Washington. She was chosen as a first-team WUSA All-Star in 2003, reached the WUSA championship game with Atlanta in 2001 and 2003, and played 56 WUSA regular-season games, five WUSA playoff games and four WPS regular-season games. She also played one season in the W-League.

Players who last played in 2011
(last year of eligibility is 2021)

Gregg Berhalter
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2006; last played professionally outside the United States in 2009; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A defender who played for the United States at the 1999 Confederations Cup and the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Berhalter played in 44 full internationals for the United States between 1994 and 2006. He played against Mexico and Germany at the 2002 FIFA World Cup, and against Brazil, Mexico and Saudi Arabia at the 1999 Confederations Cup. It was Berhalter’s header that was controversially kept out of the net by a German player’s arm in the 2002 World Cup quarterfinals. Berhalter’s 44 caps also include 14 World Cup qualifiers in 2000, 2001 and 2004. He was a member of the United States team at the 2006 FIFA World Cup and the 2003 Confederations Cup.

Berhalter’s three seasons in MLS with the Los Angeles Galaxy came at the end of a club career that was spent mostly in Europe. Earlier, he had played seven seasons in Germany, six in the Netherlands and one in England, mostly at the second-division level. He was captain at Energie Cottbus and Munich 1860, leading Cottbus to promotion in the 2005-06 season. Since his retirement as a player, he has been the manager of Swedish first-division club Hammarby and the Columbus Crew of MLS. He played in 52 MLS regular-season games and in five MLS playoff games.

Jimmy Conrad
(Last played in the A-League in 1998; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2010; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via both his U.S. National Team caps and his MLS seasons.

A defender who had a long career in MLS and also played for the United States in the World Cup.

Conrad played 13 seasons in Major League Soccer between 1999 and 2011 for San Jose, Kansas City and Chivas USA, winning an MLS championship in 2001 with San Jose. Conrad, who also won a U.S. Open Cup title in 2004 with Kansas City, was chosen to the MLS postseason Best XI four times ( 2004-06 and 2008) and was the MLS Defender of the Year in 2005.

Conrad played in 28 full internationals caps for the United States, the first against Cuba in 2005 and the last against Honduras in 2010. He played in one World Cup qualifier in 2005 and two World Cup games in 2006. He was also a member of the U.S. team that won the 2005 CONCACAF Gold Cup, playing in all six games of the tournament.

Conrad played one season in the A-League in 1998. During his MLS career he played in 308 regular-season games and in 18 playoff games.

Frankie Hejduk
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2002; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2009; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A defender who was a key man in the United States’ run at the 2002 FIFA World Cup and also had a long career in MLS.

Hejduk earned 85 caps with the United States, the first against El Salvador in 1996 and the last against Denmark in 2009. He started four of the United States’ five games at the 2002 FIFA World Cup, missing one because of a yellow-card suspension. He also played in three games at the 1998 World Cup and in 26 World Cup qualifiers in 1996, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2008 and 2009. In addition to those two World Cups, he was a member of the United States teams at the 1996 and 2000 Olympic Games, and the 1999 and 2003 Confederations Cups. He was a regular in the United States teams that won the 2002 and 2005 CONCACAF Gold Cups, playing in both finals.

Hejduk played 12 seasons in MLS between 1996 and 2011 for Tampa Bay, Columbus and Los Angeles, playing a total of 203 MLS regular-season games and 17 MLS playoff games. He was the captain of the Columbus team that won the MLS championship in 2008, and also was a runner-up in the U.S. Open Cup with Columbus in 2010. In between his two stretches in MLS, he played four seasons in the German first division and one season in the Swiss first division.

Natasha Kai
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2009; last played in WPS in 2011).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who played for the United States in both a FIFA World Cup and the Olympic Games.

Kai played in 67 full internationals for the United States, the first against Denmark in March 2006 and the last against Sweden in March 2009, scored 24 goals throughout her career. She played in all six games of the United States victory at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, and scored a goal in the quarterfinal victory over Canada. She also played in three of the United States’ six games at the 2007 Women’s World Cup.

Kai played in all three seasons of WPS, winning a WPS championship with New Jersey in 2009. She played in 59 WPS games and scored 22 WPS goals.

Kasey Keller
(Last played in the WSL in 1990; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2007; last played professionally outside the United States in 2008; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A goalkeeper who played for the United States for 17 years and also was one of the leading Americans playing pro soccer in Europe during that time.

Keller played in the 1998 and 2006 FIFA World Cups and was a member of the United States squads at two others. He also played in three of the United States’ six games at the 1995 Copa America, three of the United States’ five games at the 1999 Confederations Cup, and 31 World Cup qualifiers in 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2004 and 2005.

Keller earned 102 caps with the United States, the first against Colombia in Feb. 1990 and the last against Paraguay in July 2007. He captained the U.S. at the 1996 Olympic Games, and was chosen as the Honda Award winner in 1999 and 2005, and the U.S. Soccer Male Athlete of the Year in 1997, 1999 and 2005. He played in six CONCACAF Gold Cups, including winning that title in 2002 and 2005. Perhaps his most spectacular game in the net was the victory over Brazil in the 1998 CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Keller spent most of his club career in Europe but returned to the United States for three MLS seasons at the end, winning U.S. Open Cup titles in all three of those years (2009, 2010 and 2011). He was chosen to the MLS postseason Best XI in 2011, a year in which he also was the MLS Goalkeeper of the Year. He played in 93 MLS regular-season games and in six MLS playoff games. He played 14 seasons in English professional leagues, three seasons in the German first division, two seasons in the Spanish first division and one season in the Western Soccer League.

Jovan Kirovski
(Last played professionally outside the United States in 2004; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2004; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who played for the United States for a decade.

Kirovski’s 62 caps with the United States include 11 World Cup qualifiers in 1996, 2000, 2001 and 2004. He also was a member of the United States teams at the 1996 Olympic Games and the 1999 and 2003 Confederations Cups. He earned his first cap against Saudi Arabia in Oct. 1994 and his last against Grenada in June 2004.

Kirovski played eight seasons in MLS for Los Angeles, Colorado and San Jose, and was a runner-up for the MLS title with Los Angles in 2009. He played in 174 MLS regular-season games and in 14 MLS playoff games. He played four seasons in German professional leagues, three seasons in English professional leagues and one season in the Portuguese first division.

Tiffeny Milbrett
(Last played in the WUSA in 2003; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2005; last played professionally outside the United States in 2007; last played in the W-League in 2008; last played in WPS in 2010; last played in the WPSL in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps and her WUSA/WPS seasons.

A forward who was a prolific goalscorer for the U.S. Women’s National Team for years, starring in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup and the 1996 Olympic Games.

Milbrett earned 204 caps with the United States between 1991 and 2005. She played in every game (18) for the United States at the 1995, 1999 and 2003 World Cups, and every game (10) at the 1996 and 2000 Olympic Games. She scored 11 goals in those 28 games, including both in the 2000 Olympic final. She scored exactly 100 goals throughout her career, making her the No. 5 all-time goal scorer for the United States. She was named the U.S. Soccer Female Athlete of the Year in 2000 and 2001.

Milbrett played five seasons in first-division American club soccer, three of them in the WUSA for New York and two in WPS for Gold Pride. She was the WUSA Most Valuable Player in 2001 and won a WPS championship in 2010 with Gold Pride. She also played three seasons in the Japanese professional league, two seasons in the Swedish first division, three seasons in the W-League and one season in the WPSL. In her five WUSA/WPS seasons, she played in 97 regular-seasons games and two playoff games, and scored 41 goals.

Pat Onstad
(Last played in the NPSL in 1999; last played in the A-League in 2002; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A Canadian goalkeeper who had a successful career in MLS despite not breaking into that league until he was 32 years old.

Onstad played nine seasons in MLS between 2003 and 2011 for San Jose, Houston and D.C., and was chosen to the MLS postseason Best XI in 2003 and 2005. He won MLS championships in 2003 with San Jose, and in 2006 and 2007 with Houston. During his MLS seasons, he played a total of 223 regular-season games and 17 playoff games. He was named the MLS Goalkeeper of the Year in 2003 and 2005.

Prior to beginning his MLS career, Onstad played three seasons in the NPSL and eight seasons in the A-League. He was the goalkeeper for the Rochester team that in 1999 became the only non-MLS team to win the U.S. Open Cup since the start of MLS.

Eddie Robinson
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2008; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A defender who had a long and successful career in MLS, winning three league titles.

Robinson played 11 seasons in MLS between 2001 and 2011, all of them with the same franchise, which moved from San Jose to Houston in 2006. He was chosen to the MLS postseason Best XI in 2007, and won MLS championships in 2003 with San Jose, and in 2006 and 2007 with Houston. He played in 166 MLS regular-seasons games and in 19 MLS playoff games.

Robinson earned one cap with the United States in 2008.

Diego Serna
(Last played in MLS in 2005; last played in the USL-1 in 2009; last played in the MISL in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A Colombian forward who starred for several MLS teams.

Serna played seven seasons in MLS between 1998 and 2005 for Miami, MetroStars, New England, Los Angeles and Colorado. He was selected to the MLS Best XI in 2001 and was a runner-up in the U.S. Open Cup in 2000 with Miami. He scored at least 10 goals in each of his four seasons with Miami.

After leaving MLS, he played one season in the first division in Ecuador, one season in the third division in Brazil, one season in the USL-1 and one season in the MISL. He played in 123 MLS regular-season games and in six MLS playoff games.

Lindsay Tarpley
(Last played in the W-League in 2005; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2011; last played in WPS in 2011).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who won two Olympic gold medals with the United States.

Tarpley played in 125 full internationals for the United States, the first against Japan in Jan. 2003 and the last against Japan in May 2011. At both, the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Games, she played in all six of the United States’ games. She started the final both times and scored one of the United States’ two goals in 2004. She played three games at the 2007 Women’s World Cup, and was scheduled to be a member of the U.S. team at the 2011 Women’s World Cup before being injured shortly beforehand.

Tarpley played three seasons of WPS for Chicago, St. Louis, Boston and magicJack. She played 43 WPS games and scored eight WPS goals.

Zach Thornton
(Last played in the U.S. National Team in 2001; last played in MLS in 2011.)

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via his MLS seasons.

A goalkeeper who won numerous honors during his 15 seasons in MLS.

Thornton played in MLS from 1996 to 2011, with the MetroStars, Chicago and Chivas. In 1998 he led Chicago to the MLS championship and the U.S. Open Cup title. He was also named to the MLS postseason Best XI and was the league’s Goalkeeper of the Year. He repeated as U.S. Open Cup champion in 2000 and 2003 with Chicago, and was once again named to the Best XI and Goalkeeper of the Year in 2009. In addition to his MLS seasons, he also played one season in the Portuguese first division. He played in 281 MLS regular-season games and in 35 MLS playoff games.

Thornton earned eight caps with the United States between 1994 and 2001, playing in one World Cup qualifier in 2001.

Christie Welsh
(Last played in the WUSA in 2003; last played professionally outside the United States in 2005; last played in the U.S. National Team in 2006; last played in WPS in 2010; last played in the W-League in 2011).

Has met the Hall of Fame eligibility criteria via her U.S. National Team caps.

A forward who played for the United States for six years.

Welsh played in 39 full internationals during his career with the National Team, the first coming against Sweden in 2000 and the last against Ireland in 2006. In those 39 games, she scored 20 goals.

Welsh played one season in the WUSA for New York, and two seasons in WPS for St. Louis and Washington. She also played seven seasons in the W-League, one season in the Swedish first division and one season in the French first division.